How To Get Rid of a Tickle In Your Throat Naturally and Its Causes

By | August 19, 2022

How To Get Rid of a Tickle In Your Throat Naturally and Its Causes

If you have to describe a tickle in the throat, it can be described as a persistently unpleasant tickling sensation. This sensation, usually accompanied by a cough, can make you feel sick and cause a lot of discomfort. The reason why your throat is tickling could be your environment or a medical condition. The tickling in the throat usually goes away on its own. In this article, we discuss various remedies that you can try at home to get relief from tickling throat.

What is a tickle in the throat?

If you’ve experienced a throat sensation that’s somewhere between itchy and tickling, then you know what we’re talking about. This feeling makes your throat hoarse and makes it difficult to speak. While the accompanying cough can be irritating, it has a purpose. A cough is a natural reaction to an irritant or foreign substance in the throat. While this works in some cases, other times medical treatment is the only way to cure it.

Causes of Tickle In Your Throat?

Let’s look at the various factors that contribute to the development of a tickle in the throat.

1. Environmental factors

Exposure to irritants in the environment can cause a tickle in the throat. Some of these factors include smoke, chemicals, dust, cold and dry air.

2. Allergies

You may experience a tickle in your throat due to exposure to certain allergens. It is one of the common symptoms of an allergic reaction including stuffy nose, cough and shortness of breath. An allergic reaction develops when antibodies defend the body against foreign substances. Foods, drugs, molds and pollen are elements that can often cause an allergic reaction.

3. Colds

The common cold may be the source of your tickling throat. This viral infection causes symptoms such as an itchy and sore throat and a stuffy nose. Symptoms usually resolve on their own within 10 days. If it persists for an extended period of time, it could be a sign of a serious medical condition, such as bacterial sinusitis.

4. Laryngitis

A tickling throat can be a symptom associated with laryngitis. Globus sensation, a symptom of laryngitis, is described as a feeling of suffocation and is often associated with an itchy throat.

5. Chronic cough

A tickling in the throat accompanied by a strong cough for about 8 weeks can be a sign of a chronic cough. Along with this, changes in your voice and heartburn are also associated with a chronic cough.

Home treatment of Tickle In Your Throat

Many causes of upper respiratory tract irritation can be managed at home with lifestyle changes and over-the-counter medications.

Avoiding triggers: If the tickling sensation is caused by environmental factors such as dust, pollen, or pets, avoiding the triggers can help relieve symptoms.

  1. Lifestyle modifications: If the tickling sensation is caused by reflux, lifestyle modifications such as losing weight, quitting smoking, avoiding fatty or acidic foods, and avoiding meals 2-3 hours before bedtime can help relieve symptoms of a tickling throat.
  2. Allergy medications: Antihistamines or antihistamine/decongestant combinations such as Allegra, Claritin, or Zyrtec are first-line treatments for many causes of post-nasal drip.
  3. Cough Suppressant: Dextromethorphan (Robitussin) is an over-the-counter cough suppressant that can help manage symptoms, especially coughing at night.

Home Remedies for a Tickle In Your Throat

  • Gargling with a salt-water mixture: Mix eight ounces of water with 1/4 teaspoon of salt, gargle for 30 seconds, then spit out.
  • Lozenges: Throat lozenges and hard candies help produce saliva, keep your throat moist, and help relieve throat tickling.
  • Use over-the-counter (OTC) throat pain relievers: There are many over-the-counter pain relievers and throat sprays that can help relieve a tickling throat.
  • Rest: Give your body a break, especially if you think you might be fighting a virus or have other symptoms.
  • Drink plenty of fluids: Water and warm drinks such as herbal teas are best for a tickling throat. Avoid caffeinated or alcoholic beverages as they cause dehydration and worsen the problem.
  • Add warmth and humidity to your environment: Cold, dry air can make your throat tickle. Try using a humidifier and increasing the temperature to ease discomfort and soothe irritated airways.
  • Avoid external triggers: If you know that certain elements cause your throat to tickle, such as pollen, dust or smoke, avoid them.

When to see a doctor

Some infectious causes of upper respiratory tract irritation require examination by a physician. In addition, some chronic conditions that cause inflammation of the upper respiratory tract require evaluation and treatment by a physician. In general, if you have upper respiratory tract irritation or a cough that persists for more than eight weeks, seek medical attention.

  • Imaging: Your doctor may order a chest X-ray to assess possible causes of airway irritation.
  • Intranasal steroids: If the tickling sensation is due to allergic causes, your doctor may recommend an intranasal steroid spray, such as fluticasone (Flonase).
  • Inhalers: If the irritation is caused by airway obstruction, the doctor may prescribe an inhaled corticosteroid as treatment.
  • Antibiotics: If the irritation is caused by an acute or chronic bacterial infection in the sinuses or airways, the doctor may prescribe antibiotics.
  • Acid suppressants: If the irritation is caused by acid reflux, your doctor may prescribe antacids to improve symptoms.
  • Changing the medicine: If the respiratory tract irritation is caused by a side effect of the medicine, the doctor can change the prescription.

How to prevent a tickle in the throat

You can try these simple tips to prevent throat tickling from developing.

  1. Drink plenty of water every day.
  2. Avoid caffeine, alcohol and smoking.
  3. Wash your hands often during flu season.
  4. Stay away from known triggers and allergens.
  5. Keep your house clean and dust free.
  6. Limit consumption of cold foods, ice creams and cold drinks.
  7. Limit going out during cold weather.

How to get rid of an itchy throat at Night?

This is because during the day, your body’s natural response is to swallow frequently, which helps to drain mucus into the nose and throat. So when you get into bed at night to go to sleep, it’s harder for your body to clear your airways naturally and mucus can build up in your throat. This usually forces you to breathe through your mouth, leaving the back of your throat dry.

What causes dry throat, can it lead to something more serious, is there dry throat snoring and how to deal with it? Let’s see how to get rid of an itchy throat at night.
So what can you do to get rid of an itchy throat at night and improve your chances of sound sleep

1. Keep your throat hydrated

Keeping your throat lubricated is the best way to keep it dry, itchy and sore. Also drink plenty of fluids every day.

2. Sleep on a slope

Add extra pillows under your head and let gravity do its work naturally. This treatment is especially helpful in clearing mucus that runs down the back of your throat. Try it even while resting during the day for a restful sleep.

3. Salt water gargle

Gargling with salt water can help because the salt can help draw moisture from the surrounding tissue, which in turn can lubricate your throat. The salt reduces mucus from your swollen, inflamed tissue and helps relieve discomfort.

4. Avoid caffeine or alcohol

Itchy throat is caused by caffeine or alcohol, cut back on both, especially before bed. If you have a dust allergy, keep the air ducts clean. If you have a pollen allergy, keep your windows closed and your house as pollen-free as possible.

5. Use a lozenge

The lozenges are designed to help relieve the symptoms of a sore throat or mouth infection by soothing, lubricating and killing the bacteria that is causing the infection. Some lozenges have a unique cooling formula; which provides a cooling minty sensation and effective relief from sore throat discomfort.

6. Take a hot shower

Take a hot shower that your skin can handle. When it’s fully steamed, inhale the spell. The steam loosens mucus and can moisten and soothe a sore throat. You can also steam using a facial steamer several times a day to reduce mucus build-up in your throat.

7. A spoonful of honey

Honey is another natural infection fighter. Because it is so thick, honey coats well and soothes a sore and itchy throat. Mix a heaping teaspoon of honey into a cup of hot water and the juice of half a lemon. This honey tea can soothe a cough caused by a sore throat and aid in healing.

8. Mint mouth spray

Studies have found that peppermint contains anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antiviral properties that will help your throat heal faster. Peppermint also contains menthol. This substance helps thin mucus and soothes sore throats and coughs. Look for mouth sprays that contain peppermint oil, not just mint-flavored ones.

9. Drink Chamomile tea

Scientists have linked chamomile to a variety of health benefits. It has also been used for centuries to soothe sore throats. If you can’t ignore a sore throat, consider sipping a warm cup of chamomile tea.

FAQ

Why does my throat always tickle at night?

A tickling in the throat is caused by irritation of the upper respiratory tract and can be caused by many different infectious or inflammatory conditions. This irritation, often referred to as “post-nasal drip,” is most often caused by an upper respiratory infection and can persist for weeks after other symptoms have subsided.

What causes a tickle in your throat that makes you cough?

Irritation of the upper respiratory tract due to infectious, allergic or environmental factors causes a tickling or dripping sensation in the back of the throat leading to coughing. Some chronic conditions, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or chronic obstructive airway disease (COPD), can also cause upper airway irritation.

What causes a persistent dry tickling cough?

Irritation of the upper respiratory tract due to infectious, allergic or environmental factors causes a tickling or dripping sensation in the back of the throat leading to coughing. Some of the most common causes of a persistent dry cough are viral infections, allergies, or environmental irritants such as smoking or pollen. Certain chronic conditions, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or chronic obstructive airway disease (COPD), can also cause irritation leading to a persistent dry cough.

Why won’t the tickle in the throat go away?

Irritation of the upper respiratory tract due to infection may persist for up to 8 weeks after other symptoms have resolved. Airway irritation can also be caused by allergies or environmental irritants, in which case symptoms may persist until the allergen is avoided. In addition, irritation may be caused by a chronic condition such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or chronic obstructive airway disease (COPD) and requires diagnosis and treatment by a physician.

How long does it take for a nagging cough to go away?

Respiratory tract irritation caused by a viral illness usually resolves within 8 weeks. Often the cough persists well after the infection has cleared due to persistent airway irritation. A persistent cough does not necessarily mean that the infection is still present. However, if the cough is caused by a chronic condition or allergy, it may persist until the allergen is removed or the underlying condition is treated.

Does dehydration cause a tickle in the throat?

Yes, dehydration can lead to a tickling sensation in the throat that can worsen into pain or itching if you don’t rehydrate.

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